Gordon G Hall
Writer and Neo-Philhellene


The Silverdale Wanders

All walks start and finish at Silverdale Green by the parish notice board.

Walk Six

Map A longer walk to Arnside tower.

This is a somewhat more arduous walk although slightly less than half of it is on public roads.

You will be climbing up through Eaves Wood again, nearly to The Pepperpot

Celandine Another day, another walk, but starting off as of yesterday accross that first field. At the bottom go to your right and through the kissing gate onto the lane

Turn left along the road and when you get to Cove Road turn left noting the Celandines in the field to your right.

Fork right, staying on Cove Road.

Bowling You are now walking through a rather modern part of the village, I rather think that most of the houses date from the 1960s.

On our right now is the Silverdale Bowling Club. Bowling in this part of England is called Crown Green, and is the best. It is like Lawn Green on steroids!

You may wonder about the meaning of the legend over the entrance: Tha's nowt f'short. Let me translate! It means that you will fail to achieve a decent score if in bowling your wood (ball) you do not get as far as the Jack, which is the ball you are aiming at. So now you know . .

County Signs Carry on along this road, and eventually you find yourself in foreign parts!

So walk out of Lancashire and into Cumbria, which I should say is my spiritual home.

The border is only about 3km from my cottage and I am sorry that I live on the wrong side of it!

Holgates On our right hand side is that which is surely the unacceptable face of the area.

This is Holgates, a ghastly, no REALLY ghastly chalet and static craven complex plonked unmercifully upon this lovely landscape. Ugh!

And what is worse we actually turn right, into this slough of despond. Within 50m salvation is at hand and we follow the footpath to Arnside Tower. Do not go to Far Arnside.

Distand Knott This is a pleasing footpath, with woodland to the right and open meadowland to the left

As we go further you get a good view of Arnside Knott in the distance ahead of us. It stands out in this gently rolling countryside, a great lump of limestone lurking like a great whale and summoning us to climb it. We will leave that for a later walk.

Follow this footpath until you come to a gate. Note that our path for return journey is to go to the right at this point.

And there, before you is the tower.

Tower external

This is a pele tower - which is a fortification where the inhabitants would barricade themselves inside, with their animals on the ground floor, when the Border Rievers were afoot.

There are many examples in Cumbria and southern Scotland of Pele towers. Most of them are attached to a house, possibly built rather later. This one stands, well crumbles, majestically on its own. This is a pele tower - which is a fortification where the inhabitants would barricade themselves inside, with their animals on the ground floor, when the Border Rievers were afoot.

There are many examples in Cumbria and southern Scotland of Pele towers. Most of them are attached to a house, possibly built rather later. This one stands, well crumbles, majestically on its own.

Tower Internal Arnside Tower is not in the very best state of repair!

Apparently it was originally 5 stories high, but fire and wind and rain have played with its bones.

Whilst I admit I did venture inside to take a couple of photos I would not recommend this to you.

Bottoms lane We head homewards by taking the footpath up the hill. This is quite a long haul and will eventually lead you to the top of King Willam's Hill and the area of the Pepperpot

Keep towards the left as you make your way downhill past The Woodlands pub to the T junction with Cove Road, then take this delicately named highway bach to Silverdale Green.

And that concludes WALK SIX

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Distant Fells
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